(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Driving your own car in Germany."

&nm 










prepared by 

REICHSBAHNZENTRALE FUR DEN DEUTSCHEN REISEVERKEHR 

BERLIN W35 

Potsclamer Privatstrasse 121 B 



NEW YORK (RDV) OFFICE 

German Tourist Information 

665 Fifth Avenue 

New York City 



C O NTE NTS 



G E R M A NY 

THE L AKDV G F 



Historical Castles 



Quaint Old Towns 



Colorful Costumes 




Art Treasures 



Music 



Beer and Wine 
and Delicious Food 



Pag-e 

2 



Churches and Cathedrals . 8 



12 



14 






10 , S 





Easy Accessibility 



Health Resorts 



Sport 



Modern Architecture 



Special Attractions 



Page 

16 



Comfortable Motoring 18 



Modern Hotels 

and Seaside Places 20 



22 





W 1 





24 




26 




28 




Government interest 



30 



^^^^^^^^^H^^^^H 






G E 



the land of 




Y 



HISTORICAL CASTLES 




Castles everywhere, — that's Germany! Through green trees 
you look up from the road and there is an old castle. From the 
banks of the lovely Rhine or the lazy Moselle, you see castles; 
castles which breathe of the very life of one thousand years 
ago ; castles whose towers watch silently over the wooded hills 
and green plainlands of Germany ; castles which belong to a 
civilization of knights and flags and clashing armor. 

Or if you do not see one of these castles, you will see instead 
the palace of an ancient Prince, with its beautiful gardens, its 
well-kept hedges, its fountains and pools of silent water, any of 
which, if they could but talk, could tell of intrigues and 
conspiracy, could tell of romance and honor- 
Almost everywhere that one travels by motor car in Germany, 
there are these monuments of the past. Their doors are open to 
you for inspection and their keepers are eager to tell you of the 
individual histories of each, and show you, if you desire, the 

actual treasures which remain, possibly armor of the 

first lord of the house or maybe the original glass from 
which toasts were often drunk to fairy princesses. These 
casdes and palaces call you from the North, the South 
and the East and West of Germany. 




Neusdiwanstein Palace 



Marienburg Casi>. £ast Pnaaaa 



(centre) 
Runkel Castle on the Lahn River 



- - 




the land of 



QUAINT OL 




Quaint old houses, narrow winding streets, cobblestones, 
funny shaped pointed roofs, — in fact villages just as they were 
five and sometimes ten centuries ago. Hardly a stone is dianged. 
There are the same customs, the same kind of life. Everywhere 
in Germany the motorist will find this. Between towns and 
around most of them you will drive in perfect comfort over 
broad modern highways, but should you so desire, you 
can often take another road, one marked "Durdi die Stadt," 
which means through the city. Then, suddenly, you will 
find yourself in another world, — gone is the hurry and 
bustle of fast modern life, — gone is the smell of gasoline 
and noise of motor cars, and in their places are ox-carts 
and neck-yokes for carrying water. 

You can leave your car and wander through these wind- 
ing streets — you can see the slow moving people going 
about the same tasks which their fathers and even their 
fathers' fathers did before them — you must bend over as 
you go through an old doorway to inspect the insides of 
the more interesting houses — you can smell the delicious 
foods cooking on the same stoves and in the same kettles 
that were used in another age. Whether it be in warm south 
Germany or in cooler East Prussia, one cannot motor far 
without coming upon some such quaint old village. The 
main street is usually wide and improved and you need not 
stop, but the rest of the village is just as you have imagined 
it, just as you have read about it in story books. 



4 




In 01 1 1 i !■— n, in 



(centre) 
In an old -village 



G E R 





Y 



the land of 



COLORFUL COSTUMES 




Germany is, in reality, the land of colorful costumes. Every- 
where that you go, you see a different one. Each section of 
the country has its own. They are part of the atmosphere of the 
country. Without them Germany would not he Germany. In 
Bavaria, for instance, there are still the leather breeches, 
embroidered belts and green felt hats; in the Black Forest 
country the many colored silk wedding dresses with their 
ribbons, lace, gold buttons and crowns of beads for hats; in the 
Rhine valley others; in Hesse, Baden, Spreewald still more. 
Wherever you go, you cannot help seeing them. 

Native Germans are proud of these costumes and wear them 
at every opportunity. It is not uncommon to see the family 
fortune displayed in a beautiful hand embroidered silk shawl or 
priceless piece of old lace. These are marks of distinction and 
differentiate one group from another. In fact these people are 
often as proud of their individual dress and identity as they are 
of their fatherland. While one drives through Germany, one sees 

group after group, each seeming more picturesque than the 
former, and each an interesting study of old rural customs. 

But the best time of all to see them is, of course, at some 

festival time. During the summer, there is hardly a day 

which is not festival time somewhere in Germany. On 

these days everyone in the village dresses in his or her 

native costume. The streets are a riot of color and are full 

of dancing, singing people. They will celebrate just as their 

grandfathers and grandmothers celebrated before them. 




Southern Bavaria 



Upper Silesia 



Northern Bavaria 



5; - __- :_-_- ' - 



7 



ra^^^^^H 




E 



the land of 




! 



Y 



CHURCHES and CATHEDRALS 




Can you imagine a country in which almost every small city 
competed with almost every other small city, to see which could 
build the largest and most beautiful cathedrals? Can you imagine 
a country in which people would work on such cathedrals for 
five or six hundred years before they were finished? Yet this is 
the very thing which happened in Germany between the years 
from about 1200 to 1800. 

Think of the result! From the roofs of almost every old 
German town or village now rise majestic steeples and 
stately domes. Often it is difficult for the passing traveler 
to believe that these gorgeous reminders of another age, 
usually far out of proportion to their quaint and humble 
surroundings, could have been built and financed by sudi 
small communities. Today they are exquisite monuments 
of Germany's cultural development and no matter what 
one's architectural tastes may be, whether for Roman, 
Gothic, Baroque, Rococo or any other, if one travels far 
in Germany, one is sure to see many wonderful examples 
of each. 

A walk through some of their massive interiors, between 
narrow shafts of soft light, stopping now here before some 
delicate painting, now there before an historical tomb, will 
never be forgotten. A few moments pause, while one gazes 
at the superb architectural work of an exterior, will almost 
thrill one. Germany offers a veritable living history of cathe- 
dral architecture. One must see it to fully understand it. 



; 



8 




Mlifeili Iwift Z.i\r..iril 




the land of 



ART TREASURES 




Just as that competitive spirit between individual cities and 
towns in Germany resulted in a remarkable collection of fine 
diurdies and cathedrals, so likewise has it resulted in an amazing 
collection of art treasures. While whole towns and cities tried to 
outdo each other in architectural achievements, the burghers and 
princes of different localities tried to outdo each other in art 
collections. Such a wealth of material was brought together in 
this way that today Germany is a literal 
paradise for art-lovers. Some of these works 
can be seen in the same old palaces and 
castles in which they were originally gathered. 
The others are in well-organized museums 
of which Germany is very proud. 



For instance the student of ancient Baby- 
lonian history no longer goes to Babylon for 
his research work because the best remains 
of that civilization can be found in Berlin. 
Admirers of Rembrandt cannot afford to 
miss seeing the twenty pictures of that 
mSEHHHHH master all of which hang in the Cassel Picture 
Gallery. The Sistine Madonna in Dresden 
is world famous. It is impossible to list them all. China museums, 
book museums, furniture exhibitions, lace collections and many 
other such special things can be seen by those interested. As 
can be said about the wealth of German churches and cathedrals, 
— it is impossible to describe them all. One must see for oneself. 



10 



H«M 



, 


^H "lIHil^l^l 




1 ■■ . 


m 


; ■'.'■■ 


m 




a 






-*3 "H* ** 




Albrecht Durer, painted by himself, 
Munich 



"Jacob's Blessing" by Rembrandt, Cassel Gallery 



Frederick the Grea 
Sans Sooci-I 



■■■■■■DHBBHH^H 



G E 



the land of 




Y 



C 




One cannot think of Germany without thinking of music. 
Music has always been an integral part of German life and 
history. The names of some of her famous composers ring in 
the ears of every music lover, — Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, 
Mendelssohn, Mozart, Richard Strauss, Wagner. Everyone in 
Germany loves music. Everyone in Germany feels that music is a 
part of them. Concerts and operas are always overcrowded. Even 
the smallest towns have their bands and sometimes their orches- 
tras. Opera houses in such cities as Berlin, Dresden, Munich, 
Hamburg, Hanover and Cologne are famous. Wherever one goes 
in Germany, one will hear music. Sometimes it may be the 
singing of some famous choir; sometimes a Furtwangler concert; 
sometimes a beautiful opera; or sometimes just the voices of 
German boys and girls who often sing at either work or play. 

There is no limit and no season to German music. In summer, 
for instance, there is one music festival after another, all over the 
country, the most famous of which probably is the presentation 
of Wagnerian operas in Bayreuth. Others, too numerous to 
discuss here, might include the Mozart festival at Munich, the 
St. Thomas' Church Choir in Leipzig, special musical perform- 
ances in Baden-Baden, Bonn, Wiesbaden and many others. 
Everywhere in Germany the traveler will find people and whole 

towns immensely interested in music. One almost begins to 
feel and hear music with the first step on German soil. 



12 




600 Trumpeters in the 'Xustgarten" in Berlin 



(above) 
Native Bavarian Music 



13 




the land of 

BEER *«</ WIN 







-'•■;->:- ■ 




and DELICIOUS FOOD 

Have you ever tasted that wonderful Munich beer? Beer that 
is so soft that it virtually caresses your throat while you drink 
it. Beer that is so clear, so light, so delicious that once you have 
tried it, you will never forget it. Veritably it is the nectar of 
the gods. 

Or even better, do you know the wines of the Rhine and 
Moselle, with their ridi flavor and gorgeous taste. Can you 
imagine anything better than to sit on a special terrace along 
one of these rivers, on a warm summer night, with the moon 
rising over the water, and quietly sip the light golden liquid 
and breathe in its full fragrance. 

Of foods, too, Germany boasts of delicacies to 
satisfy the most fastidious. For instance in Berlin 
the roasted pheasant at Horcher's is a treat for any- 
one. Surrounded by an atmosphere of another cen- 
tury, Nuremberg's "Bratwurst Glodde" offers sau- 
sages and sourkrout the like of which you have 
never tasted. Everywhere in Germany, both old 
and new restaurants have dishes which will delight 
all lovers of good cooking. 

Throughout German history, our people have been 
connoisseurs in beers and wines and the foods that 
go with them. Our climate is hard and sometimes we 
must eat hearty food, but that has made us hold only 
in higher esteem the more delicate preparations. Ger- 
mans themselves often travel long distances in their own coun- 
try, just for an evening with these so-called 'finer things of life'. 



fe 



14 






■ 



WikM 




Vineyard 






Beer Wagon 





Auerbadh's Keller in Leipzig 
whidi Goethe often visited 



Delicious Food 



Outdoor lesCMzani 






/5 




to 



GERMANY 



COLOGNE 



Do you know what you have to do ? 

Application to the Foreign Travel Division of the American Automobile 
Association (AAA), 295 Madison Avenue, New York City, will supply you 
with all necessary papers. Then you drive your car down to the pier. 
A courteous official takes charge of it for you. He has it loaded on the 
ship, covered, made ready for the voyage, and you can forget all about it. 

You, in the meantime, may board the same comfortable steamer and enjoy 
a week of that gorgeous leisure which only an ocean trip can give. Then, upon 
arriving at the foreign port, without any action on your part, your car will be 
waiting on the pier to be driven off even before you are personally ready to go. 




000000000000 '0 00000000000000 pa 




0000000000000000000 000000000 



16 



-"-— - ■- ; 



1 




3 0D 00000 00 00000 00000000000 00000 




DO00OOO00000OOOOOOOO0OO0OOO0OOOC 






17 





G E 



the land of 




Y 



COMFORTABLE MOTORING 



■ 



WSM^m 



'. = ••' 




And when you get to Germany with your car, you will be 
amazed to find all the "motoring-comforts of home". The roads 
are excellent, smoothly paved, often shaded by beautiful tall 
trees and carefully marked with the same safety devices to whidi 
you are accustomed in the United States. Directions are shown 
on large signposts. Curves are indicated with white bands around 
the trees, white stones along the roads, and white posts. Police- 
men everywhere are friendly and should you know only the 
name of the town to which you wish to go, the mere mention of 

that name will be enough to have them show you the direction. 

Of course you drive on the right hand side of the road. 
Railroad crossings are clearly marked 100 yards before you 
get to them and all important ones are guarded with gates. 

In every small town there is some form of gasoline filling- 
station and usually several more between towns and cities. 
At these stations you can buy American gasoline if you 
prefer it to the German. Garages are marked by the word 
^Garage', just as in America, and at both these and almost all 
filling-stations you can have tires fixed or any necessary 
repair work done. 

The same general traffic laws exist that you have in the 
United States. Electric red and green, stop and go signs, 
usually govern traffic. When there is a complicated crossing, 
expert policemen keep order. Parking places are clearly 
marked with a large "P". Should a foreigner be guilty of some 
small violation of the traffic laws, policemen are forbearing. 



18 




Unter den Linden, Berlin 




Road Markers 



A busy corner 




Gasoline Station 



Signpost 



Railroad Crossing 





Modern Service Station 




Repairing the car 



Modern Traffic Regulation 



19 



G E 



R 



the land of 




Y 



MODERN HOTELS and 
SEASIDE PLACES 




The bell boys draw themselves up to attention. The porter 
steps out from behind his desk. What is the occasion? A guest 
is coming downstairs one morning in a German Hotel. The 
manager steps forward, bowing, and says "Good morning sir. 
I hope that you slept well. Shall I have the boy bring your car 
around?" 

Or if it is in a smaller hotel, the proprietor will greet his guests 
in the same cordial manner and offer his services for anything 
that he may be able to do. 

By tradition Germany is a hospitable country. German people 
are naturally clean, efficient and thorough, and these character- 
istics are reflected in their hotels and inns. All larger hotels 
have the modern conveniences of private baths, elevators, room 
service, etc. Smaller inns, however, although without some of 
these more fastidious luxuries, are just as comfortable, clean 
and inviting. 

But one must not forget the seaside attractions of the Baltic and 
North Seas, with their miles of wide sandy beaches, boardwalks, 
seaside cafes, modern seaside hotels, beautiful wooded surround- 
ings, sports of every kind and sunny, bracing climate. It has often 

been said that during the summer months in Germany, almost 
everyone, literally, spends some part of their vacation on the 
sea- coast. The climate is so pleasant and the life so attractive. 



20 



s 



Hi 




- 


M 




^^ 



Reichenhall 




Petersberg on the Rhine 



On the Baltic Sea Coast 



(centre) 
Cad Eilscn 



2/ 






G E 




Y 



the land of 



HEALTH RESORTS 




But Germany has more than just her Hotels and Seaside 
Places, she has in addition her famous Health Resorts, or "Spas" 
as they are sometimes called. Surrounded by an atmosphere 
of palm trees, rainbowed fountains, close -cut green grass, 
shaded paths, sunlight, flowers, quiet and warmth, these 
lovely gathering spots attract visitors from every corner of 
the globe. One comes to rest, to recuperate, to take a cure 
or just to play. For instance at the most famous of them, the 
summer social season reaches its height. Horse Shows, 

tennis tournaments, golf matches, gambling, racing 

all these can be parts of that life. 

Germany's healthful waters are among her most valu- 
able natural assets. Such everyday ailments as rheumatism, 
diabetes, kidney troubles, heart diseases, anaemia, gout, 
indigestion and many other ordinary physical deficiences 
are greatly benefited by partaking of them, to say nothing 
of the many special cures for exceptional troubles. German 
Spas are perfectly equipped in accordance with the most 
exacting requirements of modern hygiene and therapeu- 
tics. The careful scientific training of their, physicians is 
world famous. No matter what one's ailment may be, one 
can be almost sure to find in some part of Germany, a natural 
water which will help that ailment. For the motoring tourist 
such a great network of health resorts offers a most amazing 
choice of cures, sport and social life. 



22 



MMMI^HB^B^^^^^Ri 






^E3b£ ^s"--- 1 


T ?^fr ! 






^fe>;-; Tf^ 


■ 






^Rt_ ' 


"'"*& 






. ■ . 


WSSSS 








: . . ■ 


- 




^F&$9)iB^^-^ 


., ■■„■■■ ■■ ■. . p . ■ . : 

HEjffiKr'.' 


gj| 


T"^^5 










Bad - Nauheim 



k 






fc ; K7*- 
III 






■ffllllilA^M 


..'1 




'* V* ' i 


^<1« 


■£_* V-.ti li : 


ass 


~— : - 



Wiesbaden 





i£&W 


■ sLflWw! 


-#* 




-9 






T""' lf : - 


JfteT 




^ 






- 










M 















Bad Oeynhausen 




Bad Ems 



(centre) 
Casino, Bad en- Bad en 



23 









G E 



the land of 




Y 



T 




Fifty grand golf courses, a thousand tennis clubs, swimming 
pools in almost every village and hamlet, mountain climbing of 
the most interesting variety, hundreds of miles of well-kept 
wooded paths for hiking, thousands of lakes and streams for 
boating and fishing, in winter skiing and skating, — all these 
facilities and many more are at the disposal of the visiting 
motorist and sportsman. 

For instance 'golf, although a comparatively new sport in 
Germany, has taken like wildfire. Everywhere the people are 
becoming tremendously enthusiastic and the courses which have 
been developed can compare with the best in the world. No 
big hotel, health resort or major community is any 
longer up-to-date in Germany unless it has a first 
class golf course. In very much the same way tennis 
has become popular. Wherever one goes in Germany, 
one will always find smooth, hard tennis courts and 
excellent players. 

Mountain climbing in Bavaria and the so-called 
Saxon Switzerland offers almost every problem the 
mountain-climbing enthusiast can wish. The hiker 
can choose any one of hundreds of beautiful paths and 
trails and find them all well-cared-for and supplied 
with conveniently placed sleeping huts. 

Germany is one of those sporting countries whidi 
seldom indulges in a sport without developing every 
possible facility to become proficient at it. As a result of this 
practice, the visiting sportsman is literally presented with a 
paradise of wonderful sporting opportunities. 



24 



HBHHHH 







In Bavarian Alps 



The Zugspitzplatt 



25 



^^m 



G E 




the land of 



MODERN ARCHITECTURE 




It is almost impossible to imagine the amazing contrast be- 
tween the traditional architecture of Germany and the extreme 
modern developments of today. Standing side by side, one 
sees them across the fields and in the middle of the cities 
and villages. Gone is that fear of violating the sacred 
dictates of the Gothic and Baroque masters. A new style 
has arisen which is just as different from the old as day 
from night. Instead of painted walls one sees large undec- 
orated surfaces; instead of heavy construction there is light 
steel; instead of a few small windows there are sometimes 
seemingly walls of glass. It is the product of a new age, an 
age of mass production methods, large industrial developments 
and new housing problems. Old principles of building tech- 
nique were found inadequate and new ones have taken their 
place. Once thoroughly rooted, this new conception spread. 
Now it is everywhere. 

Probably Germany is the best country in the world in 
which to see and study modern architectural development. 
Few peoples have previously been so bound to traditional 
building methods as the Germans. When the break came, it 
was violent and daring. Now every part of the country has 
its modern masterpieces, each tempered only by the individual 
characteristics of its makers. No two are alike. Traveling 
by motor car one sees in a great panorama almost every 
school of this new thought. 



26 




Meeting Hall in Magdeburg 



\ 




i B ; | 




«^f* ; <■■■ 
si'i < \ 

■ - « ;■ 


ft : 

ir 


I 


■ 


'lift 


' lb 




BWk 




M: 1 1 If; J 


1 


1 IaB' b 


■ 


p 1 j|t ■ 

'1 


' 



Office Building In Dusseldorf 



Crematorium in Forst (Lausltz) 



Building Development in friprig 



27 



V 



G E 




Y 



the land of 



SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS 

Three hundred thousand people visited the little town of Oherammergau 
to see the performances of the Passion Play in 1930. More than seven hun- 
dred people actively took part in the production. And yet, that little Bavarian 
town, when it is not so inflated, boasts but two thousand inhabitants. Think 
of the setting for such a famous theme! It is the life of those people. It is 
almost their religion. Giving that play is an honor to them, a tradition. 
In the summer of 1Q34 this leads the list of Germany's Special Attractions. 
The first of its 33 performances takes place on May 21st and the last on 
Sept. 23rd. Usually given only once every ten years, 1934 is to be a very 
special year to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the first play in 1634* 

But Oherammergau has much competition. The Wagner Festival 
performances in Bayreuth are too lovely for description. The Wagner 
and Mozart festivals in Munich attract music lovers 
from all parts of the world. The open-air performances 
of local historical plays in Rothenburg, Dinkelsbiihl 
and Nordlingen are fascinating. Plays in the market 
place of Wernigerode, Rococo plays in Schwetzingen, 
outdoor rural dances in hundreds of small towns and 
villages, famous wine festivals all along the Rhine, 

music in Baden-Baden, Bonn, Breslau, Leipzig all 

these and many more wonderful opportunities make 
up the complete list of Germany's Special Summer 
Attractions. It can almost be said, that the whole 
summer is just one grand festival. If one wishes to 
spend a vacation listening to heavenly music, living 
in the very atmosphere of historical custom, enjoying 
play and frolic as people enjoyed it five hundred years ago, then, 
festival time in Germany is everything one can want or hope for. 




28 







Illumination of Heidelberg Castle 



Passion Play in Oberammergau 



Historical Play in Rothenburg 




A Wine Festival on the Rhine 



I 'immm 
The St. Thomas Church Choir in Leipzig 



From the Oberammergau Passion Play 




Historical Play in Dinkelsbiihl 



During the famous Lespzre ! 



Antique Market in Munich 



; : 



GERM A NY 

the land in 'which the 

GOVERNMENT 

takes a personal interest in making 

MOTORING COMFORTABLE 



■ 'jflHBiiYi ■•- Hi ' '' " 



. . ■■ ■■ 


. : . ■ . . 
■ ... 


..■■.■-■..■. 


Jig 




^ii^LJJ? 




^Irf* 


i . -■ 


■pi 


"NvX 




One of the dreams of every motorist is to have, wherever he goes, 
straight wide roads, banked turns, no crossings, no small towns, in 
short nothing to hinder him. Many countries have developed road 
building programs but few have been able to fulfill these dreams of 
the car owner. 

In Germany the present roads are excellent, but they are the main 
arteries of all traffic, and, as happens everywhere in the world on 
such highways, occasional hindrances to motoring are encountered. 
Because of this, plans were considered in the past for building a 
separate net of roads just for automobiles, but until recently restrictions 
imposed by different State laws and individual interests had hindered 
such a project. 

Under the new National Socialist Government there is only one 
interest — that of the Nation. It is quite clear to the leaders in our 
Government that a special net of roads, only for 
automobiles, is necessary. Plans have been drawn up, 
a committee has been formed to organize the work, 
and a special "Inspector General", Dr. Todt, has been 
appointed to supervise it for the Chancellor himself. 
It is interesting to see, that in the December 19, 1933 
issue of the English motoring magazine "The Motor", 
the following was written: "In Dr. Todt, Germany 
has found a road genius with whom one has to pass 
but little time to realize his whole-hearted enthusiasm, 
while he has a driving power which will bring his 
great schemes to the earliest possible fruition." 

Germany is fortunate in having a government 
which is so automobile-minded and which, therefore, 
takes such an interest in the building of new roads. 
Adolf Hitler is an enthusiastic motorist himself, 
having driven many thousands of miles in the last 14 years. He 
personally gave the order to begin this project. 



30 






^^^■■■■^^H 




Model showing all the athletic equipment which with be available for 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin 




OLYMPIAD 19 3 6 

It is not too early to remind you that in the summer of 1936 
there will be a new and very inviting added attraction for 
visitors who come to Germany. This will be the holding of the 
Eleventh Olympiad when the athletes from every nation (prob- 
ably between three and four thousand) again will convene to 
test their strength and skill for world honors. The last meeting 
was in 1932, in Los Angeles, California. Thousands of people 
came to see it. Thousands more will come to Berlin to see this 
one. Everything possible is being done to put the grounds in 
perfect condition and to make arrangements for housing and 
entertaining every visitor. 

The Organization Committee of the Eleventh Olympiad has 
made its headquarters at number 43 Hardenberg Street, Berlin. 
As a symbol for its work and for the Olympic Games them- 
selves, it has dhosen a bell, as pictured here, with an inscription 
which means "I am calling the youth of the world". You will begin 
to see this even as early as the summer of 1934. It literally will 
call the youth of the world to Berlin. In addition it will call 
others for the Winter Olympiad, which is also to be in Germany, 
in Garmisdi-Partenkirdien, 1936. We hope it will call you too. 



32 



OFFICES OF GERMAN AUTOMOBILE CLUBS 

(ALWAYS AT THE SERVICE OF FOREIGN MOTORISTS 



I. Der Deutsche Automobil Club (DDAC) 

(member of the "Alliance Internationale de Tourisme" and the "Federation 

Internationale des Clubs Motocyclistes") 

11a, Koniginstrasse, Munich and 9, Stiilerstrasse, Berlin 

11. Automobilclub von Deutschland (A. v. D.) 

(member of the "Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus") 
16, Leipziger Platz, Berlin WQ 

HI. Important Branch Offices of the DDAC 

District 1 — Berlin-Brandenburg, 9, Stiilerstrasse, Berlin W35 
2— Thiiringen (Thuringia), 39, Meyerstrasse, Weimar 
3—Hessen, 41/1, Stiftstrasse, Frankfurt-on-Main 
4—Niederrhein (Lower Rhine), 17, Deutscber Ring, Cologne 
5— Westfalen (Westphalia), 63, Kaiserstrasse, Dortmund 
6—Niedersachsen, 46, Konigsworther Strasse, Hanover 
7—Nordmark, 21 a, Sophienblatt, Kiel 

8—Ostland (East Prussia), 20/1, Hintertragheim, KonigsbergjPr. 
9 — Sdilesien (Silesia), Sdilossplatz, Breslau 

10— Hodiland (Bavarian Highlands), 1, Sendlingertor-PIatz, Munich 
11— Bay r. Ostmark (Eastern Bavaria), Regensburg 
12—Franken (Franconia), 17, Bahnhofstrasse, Nuremberg 
13 — Wilrttemberg, 7, Bliicherstrasse, Stuttgart 
14— Baden, 141, Kaiserstrasse, Freiburg im Breisgau 

15— Westmark (Rheinland), l8, Emil-Schiiller-Strasse, Coblence 

16— Sachsen (Saxony), 4, Zinzendorfstrasse, Dresden A. 1 
17— Ostmark, 57, Fiirstenwalder Strasse, Frankfurt j Oder 
18—Mitte (Centre), c/o E. Dehne, 22, Marktplatz, Halle/ S. 
19—Nordsee (North Sea), 70, Ostdeich, Bremen 
20 — Hansa, 86, An der Alster, Hamburg 
21—Pommern (Pomerania), 6, Kaiser -Wilhelm- Strasse, Stettin 

IV. And, scattered throughout all Germany, 1500 other Offices, repre- 
senting the DDAC, where more information can be obtained 



_ 



GERMAN GUIDE-BOOKS 



TRAVEL IN GERMANY 
BERLIN AND POTSDAM 
EAST PRUSSIA 

POMERANIA AND ITS BALTIC SEA 
BATHING RESORTS 

MECKLENBURG 

NORTH-WEST GERMANY, THE HANSE- 
ATIC CITIES, AND THE NORTH SEA 
BATHING RESORTS 

WESTPHALIA 

THE HARZ 

THURINGIA 




(IN ENGLISH) 



CASSEL AND THE AVESER 

THE RHINE 

ON THE MAIN AND RHINE 

THE PALATINATE 

BADEN, THE BLACK FOREST AND 

THE LAKE OF CONSTANCE 
WORTTEMBERG 
MUNICH AND THE BAVARIAN 

ALPS 
THE TOWNS OF NORTHERN BAVARIA 
SAXONY 
SILESIA 



SPECIAL 

(IN 



HANDBOOKS 

ENGLISH) 



SUMMER IN GERMANY. Program of the 
most important Fairs, Exhibitions, Festival Plays, 
Sporting Fixtures, Sec. 

WINTER IN GERMANY, Giving a list of the 
most important winter resorts, with several maps and 
numerous illustrations. 

GERMAN SPAS AND WATERING PLACES. 

Containing information regarding the more important 
German spas. 

HOTELS RECOMMENDED IN GERMANY. 

Containing information regarding the larger hotels 
in Germany. 
MAP OF GERMANY. This folder also contains 
information of general interest concerning commun- 
ications, passport regulations, &c. Editions in all 
languages. 

GERMANY: PASSION PLAY 1934 

OBERAMMERGAU 
GERMAN TYPES AND COSTUMES 



GERMANY: ALL ABOUT ARTISTS AND 

ART (FIRST SERIFS). An account of the develop- 
ment of German art. 

GERMANY: ALL ABOUT ARTISTS AND 

ART (SECOND SERIES). A survey of modern 
German art. 

GERMAN ROCOCO 

GERMANY: THE PERGAMON MUSEUM 

GERMANY: MODERN STYLE. A descrip- 
tion of modern German buildings. 

GERMAN UNIVERSITIES. With list of Ger- 
man Universities and other institutions for Higher 
Education, information for students, &c. 

GOLF IN GERMANY 
TENNIS IN GERMANY 
BOATING IN GERMANY 
GERMANY: ANGLER'S GUIDE 



ALL THE FOREGOING ARE OBTAINABLE IN: 

UNITED STATES 

German Tourist Information Office, 665 Fifth Avenue, New York City 

GREAT BRITAIN 

German Railways Information Bureau, 1° Regent Street, London S.W.I 

and 

GERMAN TOURIST INFORMATION OFFICES IN OTHER COUNTRIES 



Cars weighing 


One way 


Round trip 


Cars weighing 


One way 


Up to 3000 lbs 


$ 105 


$ 180 


Up to 3000 lbs 


$ 90 


3001 to 4000 lbs 


$ 120 


$ 205 


3001 to $000 lbs 


$ 100 


4001 to 5000 lbs 


§ 140 


$ 235 


tOOl to 5000 lbs 


$ 115 


Over 5000 lbs 


8 160 


$ 265 


Over 5000 lbs 


$ 135 



IMPORTANT DETAILS 

What will it cost to get all licences necessary to drive your own car in Germany ? 

By writing to the Foreign Travel Division of the American Automobile Association (AAA), 295 Madison 
Avenue, New York City, you can secure, before you leave the United States, all necessary licences 
and customs papers. These will cost from $25 to $50, including your "Carnet de passage", valid for 
Germany as well as for the other European countries. Your own Club or travel agent can assist you in 
these matters. 

What import duties are there when you bring your car into Germany? 

There are no actual import duties but it is necessary to make a deposit of $ 100 with the American Auto- 
mobile Association before you leave the United States. This deposit is returnable when you come home. 

What is the cost of bringing your car on a boat to Germany? 

That cost depends upon the weight of your car and the kind of boat on which you bring it. Following is 
an approximate table of such costs: 

FIRST CLASS STEAMERS CABIN STEAMERS 

Round trip 

$ 160 
$ 170 
$ 190 
$ 220 

What other dxarges are there to drive your car in Germany? 

The&U oi^AQQiore charge, /nfeflrfeltTArtrrie pffl"^ ^^ P^ d l^iV 1 i M I }n ring German y y° u P a ^ 
enough" to mVer ^ura^^^ istiH&kJ&u^ country. 

What do garages and gasoline cost? 

Garages in Germany charge from half a mark to two marks per night for storage. Almost all of them can 
do ordinary repair work. In larger cities, from which a motorist is never very far, there are garages which 
can satisfy every possible need. Most of these have English-speaking attendants. The cost of gasoline 
in Germany runs from about 33 pfennigs to 43 pfennigs a litre. 

Where can you obtain a chauffeur, if you need one, to drive your car for you? 

You can secure a chauffeur through the "Offices of the DDAC" (see the back of the map), or 
through the porters in the larger hotels. 

What do hotels cost in Germany ? 

Naturally the prices of hotel accommodations depend upon the kind of accommodations desired but a 
general average for an ordinary room is from 2 to 7 marks per night in the smaller hotels and froni 
4 to 10 marks per night in the larger ones. 

Where can you get further information about general conditions, roads, etc.? 

In Germany all automobile clubs have recently been amalgamated into one large club, Der Deutsche 
Automobil Club (DDAC), which has offices or representatives in almost every city in Germany (exact 
addresses can be seen on the back of the map). All these are at the disposal of the visiting motorist, with 
itineraries, road-maps, guides, etc. In addition, the "Automobilclub von Deutschland", located in Berlin, 
has retained its entity, and its information bureau specializes in aiding the foreigner. All the offices of 
the Reidisbahnzentrale can also give the traveler information about motoring in Germany. Gasoline 
stations and garages have maps and usually are acquainted with at least all local conditions. Finally, 
hotels in every part of Germany are thoroughly equipped to assist the visiting motorist with any 
information which he may wish to have. 

TRAVEL IN GERMANY IN THE ECONOMICAL WAY! DRIVE YOUR OWN CAR! 

234IOO Printed in Germany